Sex, Drugs & Tapas

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Good Peoples
Asker Anonymous Asks:
How far have you gone with a guy?
sexdrugstapas sexdrugstapas Said:

perks-of-being-chinese:

i went to canada with my dad once

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

snazziest:

awwww-cute:

She looked perfectly into the camera

she looked perfectly into eternity u mean

HALLOWEEN EYES

(via imito)

I understand the visceral reaction to the news of these health workers’ deaths. However, I’m also made incredibly uncomfortable by it, considering the whole picture of what is unfolding. That being said, this is a must-read.

I feel like this incredibly well-written reminder is called for, now that the news outlets have seemingly stopped caring about the aftermath of just happened in Gaza. 

africaisdonesuffering:

africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Waist Beads”
The growing popularity of waist beads as a trend in the West has led them to take on their own meanings and interpretations. Now, many women wear them as a form of personal expression or as a fashion statement. Although waist beads are not limited to any race, culture, or country, it is still very important to know and understand the significance of waist beads within African cultures.
Waist beads have a long history in Africa dating back to ancient Egypt and are worn for various reasons and purposes. They are a symbol and celebration of womanhood, sexuality, femininity, fertility, healing, spirituality, body shaping, first menses, protection, seduction, and wealth amongst other things. The meaning of the colors and different shapes of beads varies with every tribe and they can be thought of as a visual dialect. Each bead, color, and shape relays a different message depending on the receiver.
continue reading

The Best of Rise Africa: From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.
We’re still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system, but we dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations we enjoyed through Rise Africa and our collective community.
We welcome you to become a member and join this international network to connect with other young people using their skills, interests, and voices to diversify the African narrative.

africaisdonesuffering:

africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Waist Beads”

The growing popularity of waist beads as a trend in the West has led them to take on their own meanings and interpretations. Now, many women wear them as a form of personal expression or as a fashion statement. Although waist beads are not limited to any race, culture, or country, it is still very important to know and understand the significance of waist beads within African cultures.

Waist beads have a long history in Africa dating back to ancient Egypt and are worn for various reasons and purposes. They are a symbol and celebration of womanhood, sexuality, femininity, fertility, healing, spirituality, body shaping, first menses, protection, seduction, and wealth amongst other things. The meaning of the colors and different shapes of beads varies with every tribe and they can be thought of as a visual dialect. Each bead, color, and shape relays a different message depending on the receiver.

continue reading

The Best of Rise Africa: From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.

We’re still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system, but we dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations we enjoyed through Rise Africa and our collective community.

We welcome you to become a member and join this international network to connect with other young people using their skills, interests, and voices to diversify the African narrative.

(via ezibota)

discovergames:

Me chatting about games journalism over on twitter.

esswishlist:

35. Bulbasaur Flowerpot (Succulent Monsters)

x7r found them! :) you can buy these from here or there is a 3D print version

HOW DO I ACHIEVE THIS

(via geekandsundry)

knowyourmeme:

Hamsters for everyone.

knowyourmeme:

Understanding the Scottish Independence referendum. 

nprglobalhealth:

Which Contagious Diseases Are The Deadliest?

No one knows what the death toll in the Ebola epidemic will be. As of Tuesday, nearly 2,500 people have died and nearly 5,000 have caught the virus, the World Health Organization says.

So how does this epidemic compare with the toll taken by other contagious diseases?

Comparing fatality rates could help put the current Ebola outbreak in perspective. Trouble is, getting an accurate value for many diseases can be hard, especially in places where the health care infrastructure is weak.

Take the situation in West Africa right now. “We can only count those who come to the doctor, not those who stayed home and got well, or those who stayed home and died,” says Carol Sulis, an epidemiologist at Boston University School of Medicine and the Boston Medical Center.

Another issue is that “deadliest” can mean two things. It can refer to the fatality rate — the number of deaths per number of cases — or it can mean the number of deaths in total caused by a disease.

What’s more, diseases can take a different toll in different parts of the world. In low- and middle-income countries, only limited medical care may be available, if that. This will raise the fatality rate for many infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis, malaria and infectious diarrhea.

"Similar to Ebola, people’s chances of survival increase for most of these [contagious] diseases, some dramatically, if people receive medical treatment," says epidemiologist Derek Cummings, at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Even if lists have their limitations, they can shed light. We spoke to Cummings and Sulis and consulted data from the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to come up with two lists: the deadliest contagious diseases by death toll and by death rate if untreated.

See the lists here.

Photo: Do you know what the deadliest disease is? Hint: It’s not Ebola (viral particles seen here in a digitally colorized microscopic image, at top right, along with similar depictions of other contagious diseases) NPR Composite/CDC

fitzefitcher:

daggerpen:

monicalewinsky1996:

Trigger warning: Breakfast

Holy shit.

reasons why we don’t make fun of seemingly odd triggers

(via dion-thesocialist)