Sex, Drugs & Tapas

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Good Peoples

kite62:

libri by o_bbiond on Flickr.

(via teachingliteracy)

weirdvintage:

Syphilis: The Great Crippler poster, 1937 (via)

(via nprglobalhealth)

So what am I? As a young person I imagined myself a sort of vengeful spirit. A schoolyard Robin Hood who attacked the strong and popular on behalf of the social outcasts. I’m 36 years old now though and I realize what I am is a bully. I may have been the one who got beat up but I sent plenty of kids home in tears. I also realize that I carried those ridiculous insecurities into adulthood. I still see people who attack me as the enemy and I strike back with the same ferocity as that seventh grader I used to be. I’m ashamed of that and embarrassed. The crazy thing is I don’t even necessarily believe the stuff I say a lot of times. It would probably be more noble if I did. The truth is I just say them to be mean. I say them because I know they will hurt. It’s pretty fucked up.

Ladies and gentlemen…we have a truly sincere apology from Mike Krahulik. I didn’t expect that of him, I really didn’t.

nostalgerie:


Jewish musicians in Morocco

nostalgerie:

Jewish musicians in Morocco

smallgovernment:

go up to a guy in a fedora and say “hey I like your cowboy hat”

HAHAHAHAHAHAHA

(via )

theatlantic:

What Movies About Slavery Teach Us About Race Relations Today

There are relatively few movies about slavery. Wikipedia lists about 30 total, and that includes films like Birth of a Nation, Gone With the Wind, and Spartacus, which are not especially interested in the experience of slaves in the antebellum South. In comparison, there are more than 180 films about the Holocaust (not counting documentaries). It’s true that the Holocaust was more recent—but, on the other hand, slavery occurred in the U.S., home of Hollywood. You’d think film might have something to say about it.

Perhaps things will change, given the enormous critical success of this year’s 12 Years a Slave. But should we want them to? What do we gain, if anything, from the cinematic portrayal of slavery? What would we get from 180 films about slavery, or from 30? Or, for that matter, from one?

Read more. [Image: Channel Four Films]

In January 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Kalydeco, the first drug to treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis, after just three months of review. It was one of the fastest approvals of a new medicine in the agency’s history. Vertex Pharmaceuticals, which discovered and developed the drug, priced Kalydeco at $294,000 a year, which made it one of the world’s most expensive medicines. The company also pledged to provide it free to any patient in the United States who is uninsured or whose insurance won’t cover it. Doctors and patients enthusiastically welcomed the drug because it offers life-saving health benefits and there is no other treatment. Insurers and governments readily paid the cost. Several months later, Zaltrap was approved to treat colorectal cancer. The drug was discovered by Regeneron, an emerging biopharmaceutical company like Vertex, but sold by the French drug maker Sanofi. Though it worked no better in clinical trials than Roche’s cancer drug Avastin, which itself adds only 1.4 months to life expectancy for patients with advanced colorectal cancer, Sanofi priced Zaltrap at $11,000 a month, or twice Avastin’s price. Unexpectedly, there was resistance. Doctors at Memorial Sloan-Kettering in New York, one of the world’s leading cancer centers, decided Zaltrap wasn’t worth prescribing. They announced their decision—the first time prominent physicians anywhere had said “Enough” to the introduction of a high-priced cancer drug—on the op-ed page of the New York Times. Three weeks later Sanofi effectively dropped its price by half through rebates to doctors and hospitals. Even so, British health authorities said they would not pay for the treatment. The FDA approved 39 new drugs in 2012, the most in a decade and a half—a sign that the pharmaceutical industry may be recovering from its long fallow period. Wall Street applauded the revival, especially because many drug companies are facing patent expiration for their top-selling products and could see dwindling revenues after years of lackluster research productivity. Most of the new drugs either treated rare diseases like cystic fibrosis or were marginal improvements over existing cancer drugs. All carried extremely high price tags.

seenontabletop:

After seeing it on Tabletop, my wife and I got Alhambra as a holiday gift, and we spent part of our NYE enjoying a game. “Dirk” (the imaginary third player) got a lucky draw of lots of towers. Dirk cheats.

(via wilwheaton)

flash-thunder:

Women make up 45% of the gaming community and 0% of the protagonists of the 25 biggest games of the year.

"Yes, but that’s still a minority! If more women played video games, there would be more reason to have female protagonists!"

Men make up 35% of the cinema audience and 84% of the protagonists of the 25 biggest movies of the year.

Real talk.

(via discovergames)

The short story is like an exquisite painting and you might, when looking at this painting, be wondering what came before or after, but you are fully absorbed in what you’re seeing. Your gaze is fixed, and you are fully engaged. That’s the beauty of the short story.
nprfreshair:

British writer Lucy Lethbridge chronicled the evolution of the service industry in her book Servants: A Downstairs History Of Britain From The Nineteenth Century To Modern Times. Today on Fresh Air she discusses the paradox of how servants were expected to be both visible and invisible:

Servants are in this rather curious position of being both required of being highly visible and completely invisible. The high visibility of a servant with an elaborate uniform opening the door is very much an indication of status, we use it all the time as a shorthand in films and television programs … for grandeur.


At the same time, the wheels of the house were oiled and required to be run without any apparent effort at all. So if you passed a servant sweeping the stairs she either had to turn her face to the wall or she nipped behind little doorways that were often … on staircases or along corridors or back stairs because her presence is almost an admission that the house didn’t run itself.


via the guardian

This might help some folks understand our beloved Downton Abbey a little better. 

nprfreshair:

British writer Lucy Lethbridge chronicled the evolution of the service industry in her book Servants: A Downstairs History Of Britain From The Nineteenth Century To Modern Times. Today on Fresh Air she discusses the paradox of how servants were expected to be both visible and invisible:

Servants are in this rather curious position of being both required of being highly visible and completely invisible. The high visibility of a servant with an elaborate uniform opening the door is very much an indication of status, we use it all the time as a shorthand in films and television programs … for grandeur.

At the same time, the wheels of the house were oiled and required to be run without any apparent effort at all. So if you passed a servant sweeping the stairs she either had to turn her face to the wall or she nipped behind little doorways that were often … on staircases or along corridors or back stairs because her presence is almost an admission that the house didn’t run itself.

via the guardian

This might help some folks understand our beloved Downton Abbey a little better.