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Posts tagged "history"

weirdvintage:

Syphilis: The Great Crippler poster, 1937 (via)

(via nprglobalhealth)

nostalgerie:


Jewish musicians in Morocco

nostalgerie:

Jewish musicians in Morocco

nprfreshair:

British writer Lucy Lethbridge chronicled the evolution of the service industry in her book Servants: A Downstairs History Of Britain From The Nineteenth Century To Modern Times. Today on Fresh Air she discusses the paradox of how servants were expected to be both visible and invisible:

Servants are in this rather curious position of being both required of being highly visible and completely invisible. The high visibility of a servant with an elaborate uniform opening the door is very much an indication of status, we use it all the time as a shorthand in films and television programs … for grandeur.


At the same time, the wheels of the house were oiled and required to be run without any apparent effort at all. So if you passed a servant sweeping the stairs she either had to turn her face to the wall or she nipped behind little doorways that were often … on staircases or along corridors or back stairs because her presence is almost an admission that the house didn’t run itself.


via the guardian

This might help some folks understand our beloved Downton Abbey a little better. 

nprfreshair:

British writer Lucy Lethbridge chronicled the evolution of the service industry in her book Servants: A Downstairs History Of Britain From The Nineteenth Century To Modern Times. Today on Fresh Air she discusses the paradox of how servants were expected to be both visible and invisible:

Servants are in this rather curious position of being both required of being highly visible and completely invisible. The high visibility of a servant with an elaborate uniform opening the door is very much an indication of status, we use it all the time as a shorthand in films and television programs … for grandeur.

At the same time, the wheels of the house were oiled and required to be run without any apparent effort at all. So if you passed a servant sweeping the stairs she either had to turn her face to the wall or she nipped behind little doorways that were often … on staircases or along corridors or back stairs because her presence is almost an admission that the house didn’t run itself.

via the guardian

This might help some folks understand our beloved Downton Abbey a little better. 

I want this game so badly now…WHY CAN’T I HAVE NICE THINGS, GUYS?

roxygen:

Moroccan Jewish tin smiths, c. 1940s.

The Maya people of Mexico and Central America received quite a bit of attention this month thanks to a misinterpretation of their calendar. Word spread all over the globe that the ancient culture had predicted the world would end on Dec. 21.

Dear everyone: Please stop talking about the Maya like they don’t exist anymore. It’s part of a trend where we pretend that Native Americans are ‘extinct’ so that we can ignore the continued problems they face - often, at our hands.

See also: How’s about letting the Maya interpret the goddamn Mayan calendar.

fuckyeahethnicwomen:

kapwacollective:

“While women in precolonial Philippines were often designated to the venerable position of the babaylan, it was not an uncommon occurrence for them to pick up arms and become warriors.”  - from the article:

The Filipina as Ritualist and Warrior By Perry Gil S. Mallari 

Image: Filipina actor, Marian Rivera as the Visayan warrior, Amaya welding her sword for justice.  Watch free episodes of “Amaya”online

Come learn with us.  - Kapwa Collective

Blog: kapwacollective.tumblr.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/kapwacollective

Has this outfit been sexified or is this what they would have worn? It reminds me of a lehenga.

(via fuckyeahhardfemme)

If you were committed to a psychiatric institution, unsure if you’d ever return to the life you knew before, what would you take with you? That sobering question hovers like an apparition over each of the Willard Asylum suitcases. From the 1910s through the 1960s, many patients at the Willard Asylum for the Chronic Insane left suitcases behind when they passed away, with nobody to claim them. Upon the center’s closure in 1995, employees found hundreds of these time capsules stored in a locked attic. Working with the New York State Museum, former Willard staffers were able to preserve the hidden cache of luggage as part of the museum’s permanent collection. “There were many patients in these asylums who were probably not unlike friends you and I have now.”

Photographer Jon Crispin has long been drawn to the ghostly remains of abandoned psychiatric institutions. After learning of the Willard suitcases, Crispin sought the museum’s permission to document each case and its contents. In 2011, Crispin completed a successful Kickstarter campaign to help fund the first phase of the project, which he recently finished. Next spring, a selection of his photos will accompany the inaugural exhibit at the San Francisco Exploratorium’s new location.

Crispin’s photographs restore a bit of dignity to the individuals who spent their lives within Willard’s walls. Curiously, the identities of these patients are still concealed by the state of New York, denied even to living relatives. Each suitcase offers a glimpse into the life of a unique individual, living in an era when those with mental disorders and disabilities were not only stigmatized but also isolated from society. (All photos by Jon Crispin.)

(Continued…)

Banning toys with dangerous acids was a good idea, but was the price a couple generations of scientists?

The chemistry set had clearly seen better days. Curator Ann Seeger pulls the mid-20th-century Gilbert kit out of a glass-fronted cabinet in the back of a cluttered storeroom at the National Museum of American History and opens the bright blue wooden box, revealing that several bottles of chemicals are missing and some vials have lost their labels. The previous owners hadn’t let a few missing pieces stop them, though; the kit was supplemented with a set of plastic measuring spoons that appear to have been stolen from a mother’s kitchen.

One of the museum’s librarians donated the kit; he and his brother had played with it as children. “They weren’t very good with chemistry,” Seeger says, which may explain the donor’s career choice.

The museum’s collection contains several brightly colored kits harkening from the toy’s brief heyday in the early- to mid-20thcentury, when the chemistry set was the must-have toy for the budding scientist. The story of how the chemistry set rose to such prominence and then fell follows the arc of 20th-century America, from its rise as a hub of new commerce to an era of scientific discovery, and reflects the changing values and fears of the American people.

thesmithian:

…Drum’s…portrayals of black urban life, arts, politics and culture were revolutionary. Some of those images will be part of a major exhibition that opens at the International Center of Photography this month called “Rise and Fall of Apartheid: Photography and the Bureaucracy of Everyday Life.” “It was dangerous and difficult work,” Schadeberg says, recalling how the secret police kept the magazine under surveillance. “What we tried to show was how unjust apartheid was.”

more.

(via dynamicafrica)

Hell is an honest-to-god 12 hour workday. Just gonna throw that out there.

Bitching aside, it is my opinion that the interwebs could use a little more of this. 2 words: You’re. Welcome.

In related news, here is the internet making sweet, sweet love to you:

Awwww yeah. (Associated bling found here.)

brotherbrain:

Berzerk 5200 by Brother Brain   
Berzerk (Atari 5200) Stern/Atari 1983.

ilovecharts:

The Internet, A Decade Later

via Cameron

I usually don’t do these big infographics, but this is a freaking gif!

This is possibly the nerd/IT equivalent of remembering a time when horse-drawn buggies were used on the regular.

prostheticknowledge:

The Rosetta Disk

Long Now Foundation’s Rosetta Project have created a miniature archive featuring all of the world languages laser etched onto a small disc that can fit in your hand:

The Rosetta Disk is intended to be a durable archive of human languages, as well as an aesthetic object that suggests a journey of the imagination across culture and history. We have attempted to create a unique physical artifact which evokes the great diversity of human experience as well as the incredible variety of symbolic systems we have constructed to understand and communicate that experience.

The Disk surface shown here, meant to be a guide to the contents, is etched with a central image of the earth and a message written in eight major world languages: “Languages of the World: This is an archive of over 1,500 human languages assembled in the year 02008 C.E. Magnify 1,000 times to find over 13,000 pages of language documentation.” The text begins at eye-readable scale and spirals down to nano-scale. This tapered ring of languages is intended to maximize the number of people that will be able to read something immediately upon picking up the Disk, as well as implying the directions for using it—‘get a magnifier and there is more.’

… The pages are microscopically etched and then electroformed in solid nickel, a process that raises the text very slightly - about 100 nanometers - off of the surface of the disk. Each page is only 400 microns across - about the width of 5 human hairs - and can be read through a microscope at 650X as clearly as you would from print in a book. Individual pages are visible at a much lower magnification of 100X. The outer ring of text reads “Languages of the World” in eight major world languages.

Here is a video by Scott Oller about the Rosetta Project:

Rosetta from Scott Oller on Vimeo.

You can find out more about the project here

For me, this is far more remarkable and important than any expedition to Mars ever could be.

(via thejessicats)